English

Vol. 8 4, 2018 p 444-455

Pages

Article name, authors, abstract and keyword

444-455

Biocorrosion as a factor in the underground pipeline degradation process

Larisa P. Khudyakova a

a Science & Technology Centre of Pipeline Transportation of Transneft R&D, LLC (STC Transneft R&D, LLC), 144/3 Oktyabrya prospect, Ufa, 450055, Russian Federation

DOI: 10.28999/2541-9595-2018-8-4-444-455

Abstract: Issues related to biocorrosion occurring in the underground pipelines due to effects from vital activities of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) inhibiting the soil. The destructive effects produced by microorganisms in the soil environment can affect the metal itself and relevant protective pipeline coating. Sulfur reducing bacteria (SRB), iron-depositing bacteria and thionic bacteria (TB) are the most dangerous microorganisms triggering or accelerating the corrosion processes in the subsoil environment. Aerobic bacteria (AB) are constant contributers to the soil microbiocenosis irrespective of the soil type. SRB and TB undoubtedly benefit in the soil community environment from their neighborhood with AB by initiating tough and complex relations with the latter.
The completed laboratory studies for soil samples, insulation and scrapings from the pipe surface (from underneath of exfoliated isolation) have demonstrated: the physical and chemical composition and characteristics of the studied soil (including pH value, oxidation-reduction potential, humidity; content of humus, chloride ions, hydrogen carbonate ions, total iron and sulphates) indicate that the studied samples composition is favorable for the growth and development of microorganisms. The microbiological studies testified to an extensive proliferation of microorganisms across pipe line routes. SRB were found in 90 % of studied samples with their quantities varying from single units to 7∙106 kl/g (kl/cm2). Filamentous fungi were found in all soil samples, insulation samples and scrubbed material samples. The quantity of microscopic fungi varying from 150 to 21714 rl/g indicate that they are a primary threat to the pipe insulation materials, which can be affected by the fungi destructive action resulting in degradation of materials. A conclusion was made on the basis of completed studies on that the soil in the installation areas of main oil products pipelines (MOPP) is biologically contaminated. In certain environments it can become a decisive factor in the corrosion failure of underground pipelines.

Keywords: corrosion, soil, underground pipe lines, volume electric resistivity, oxidation-reduction potential, sulfur reducing bacteria, thionic bacteria, iron-depositing bacteria, anaerobes, filamentous fungi, insulation coating, laboratory studies, breeding ground, microbiocenosis, soil corrosion activity.

For citation:
Khudyakova L. P. Biocorrosion as a factor in the underground pipeline degradation process. Nauka i tehnologii truboprovodnogo transporta nefti i nefteproduktovScience & Technologies: Oil and Oil Products Pipeline Transportation. 2018;8(4):444455. DOI: 10.28999/2541-9595-2018-8-4-444-455.

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